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Class 83
Class 83
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KonstantineChoo


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Ride Cut Short - RM50 Winner
Ride Cut Short - RM50 Winner

            

Ride Cut Short - RM50 Winner
Description: These commuting train passengers had to walk onthe railway tracks to get alternative transportation to work after their train’s cable snapped near the Pantai Dalam station in Kuala Lumpur.
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Date: 21.08.2008 17:08
Hits: 2265
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Rating: 3.00 (2 Vote(s))
File size: 69.3 KB
Added by: CJ Gill


Author: Comment:
Wirajack
Member

Join Date: 15.04.2005
Comments: 1423
Cable

snapped? What, which cable?
22.08.2008 10:18 Offline Wirajack
EMU12
Member

Join Date: 20.03.2004
Comments: 0
I hazard

perhaps the Overhead cable?
22.08.2008 10:25 Offline EMU12
Angsa3212
Member

Join Date: 28.01.2008
Comments: 3867
Why?

For what reason the cable snapped? Is it already too old to bear all the friction?
22.08.2008 11:46 Offline Angsa3212
EMU12
Member

Join Date: 20.03.2004
Comments: 0
oh

many reasons...
22.08.2008 11:54 Offline EMU12
Mighty_Jacksparrow
Member

Join Date: 28.01.2008
Comments: 0
eh?

stainless steel alloy overhead cable snapped? kiddin' me or somethin'?
31.08.2008 20:09 Offline Mighty_Jacksparrow
EMU12
Member

Join Date: 20.03.2004
Comments: 0
dude

they are not made of stainless steel.
01.09.2008 08:30 Offline EMU12
Mighty_Jacksparrow
Member

Join Date: 28.01.2008
Comments: 0
yeah

my bad. single core central conductor type, maybe, probably with some copper and other non ferrous materials to provide better conduits to the pantograph. and some polymeric tubular insulation at some parts.

man i don't know how these things work.

but still these types of engineering materials are built to stand extreme weather conditions relative to its working environment. failures as such may indicate something is wrong with the system, or is maybe just another false alarm.
02.09.2008 01:23 Offline Mighty_Jacksparrow
EMU12
Member

Join Date: 20.03.2004
Comments: 0
dude

they are built to a certain strength to withstand some amount of tension, but not an absolute one. You don't for example expect the cable to still be in place if a lorry from an overhead bridge falls onto the tracks down below. ;-p Something critical must have happened to cause the tension of the cable to be more than what it was designed to withstand.

I am sure you trained as an engineer will know that there are tons of possibilities that are causes to a single outcome. ;-) Permit me to quote NGC's Seconds From Disaster: "Disaster's don't just happen, they are triggered by a chain of critical events. " There is no single point of failure.

If we meet up one day I can explain, perhaps over tea ;-)
02.09.2008 09:15 Offline EMU12
Mighty_Jacksparrow
Member

Join Date: 28.01.2008
Comments: 0
yeah, again

that's what playing into my mind all these while. fabricated metals are meant to withstand the designed tensions with safe working capacity, and provided that this capacity is exceedingly high the material will fail, no doubt about that.

as an engineer, of course this event traces out some curiosity in one.

If there's a lorry that crashed onto the cables and seen in the picture, i wouldn't be too curious anymore isnt it? =p

so what really happened, anyway?
05.09.2008 04:25 Offline Mighty_Jacksparrow
EMU12
Member

Join Date: 20.03.2004
Comments: 0
...

AFAIK these are pure metal. Not an alloy. There's a limit to the tension which it can withstand, and the fact that it snapped tells you the force whatever caused it was more than it could tolerate.

What really happened? Hmm...bearing in mind this is a public forum accessible to even the press which has the propensity to quote of context (Malay Mail a few months back for example), and my own bad experience whereby what I said was twisted to mean something I have no idea I was saying, I'd rather have this told over a cup of tea...I'm sure you understand...anytime man! ;-)
05.09.2008 08:57 Offline EMU12
Mighty_Jacksparrow
Member

Join Date: 28.01.2008
Comments: 0
not alloy eh

impressive..very impressive, very interesting.

well let me know about the material and maybe i could find out more about it in the metal laboratory later. quite interesting to know that. phew. wasn't all interested in electric anyway, hence the mechanical background :b
05.09.2008 15:02 Offline Mighty_Jacksparrow
MalcolmWJones
Member

Join Date: 05.04.2004
Comments: 368
Not uncommon

Throughout the world this is a not uncommon occurrence. Perhaps it is less common in Malaysia due to the relatively low speed of the Komuter trains and the relatively short distance of wired track. Foreign objects getting tangled in the wires is one cause - when a moving train arrives at that point something has to give - better the wire than the train. A faulty/broken pantograph could also be a cause. Another cause which wouldn't happen in Malaysia is a build up of ice in cold weather - the extra weight of the ice makes a huge difference. An extremely strong wind is yet another possibility. I have a friend who is a quality engineer on railways, I'll ask him if his remit includes overhead wiring. He wrote the quality documentation for the Channel Tunnel Rail Link and is currently contracted to London Undergroud.
A couple of months ago the same thing happened on our local metro line here (also metre-gauge). I happened to be waiting for the next train and ended up being bussed along to the next section so I could get into the city. When I came back later in the day the breakdown train had arrived and repairs were in progress. Being a single track line another train was trapped beyond the incident all day!
02.03.2009 05:16 Offline MalcolmWJones



 

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